Dear Venice, Wish You Were Here #3

One of my students, who was here for the year from Germany, tried to help me translate and decipher this postcard, but some of the handwriting is beyond us.

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This group wrote the postcard on a Monday, that is clear, and it is signed by numerous people. Do you think it’s a family? A tour group? I can read some of the names, like Hansi and Eva. Can you read the others? They appear to have addressed the card to “Herren und Frauen,” Men and women.

What do you think–had they just experienced the fireworks of Redentore and bought this postcard as a memento?

Though the postal stamp looks like it says 1852, that can’t be right, as the postcard is in color. Maybe 1952? I am no scholar of postcards and postal stamps. Someone else can probably discover the date based on the stamps themselves. Anyone out there know this information?

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***Since I posted this, a number of people have contacted me via email or Facebook, rather than commenting here, to share their investigations. Here is what has been shared:

<<I’m not a scholar of stamps but the style of the postcard is about early 60s’, I remember it very well.
Both the stamps are “serie michelangiolesca” 1961 (Paintings by Michelangelo).
So the date of the postcard is 1962.
Maybe the two stamps could have a certain value. It is to be verified.>>

<<The address is in Wien (Austria)

Fritz-Pregl-Gasse

The street is dedicated to a Nobel Prize of chemistry

The name of the family Obereder is still in Wien but it seems nobody is in Fritz-Pregl-Gasse:
https://www.google.it/search?q=obereder+wien&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=it-it&client=safari
It would be very interesting to be able to trace the recipients of the postcard.>>

<<The Redentore in 1962 was on Sunday 22 July, the day after, when the postcard was signed, was Monday 23 and the postcard was stamped by Poste at the date of 25 July>>
<<The comment of Bert is good but he has forgotten the last word “sendet” which is the past participle of the verb “senden” (to send) which in German always puts at the end of the sentence.>>
<<Die herzlichsten Grüße aus Venedig sendet Vlaida (?) (und Peter).
Vlaida (?) sends her best wishes from Venice.
Then Peter added his name. So did the others (Eva etc)
The postcard is addressed to Mr and Mrs Obereder.
It was certainly sent after the unification of Italy (see “poste italiane”, in 1852 Italy didn’t exist and Venice was part of the Austrian empire.>>

About seductivevenice

Teacher, writer, traveler, dancer, reader, photographer, gardener.
This entry was posted in Italian heritage, Venice, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Dear Venice, Wish You Were Here #3

  1. Bert says:

    I can see ‘hertzlichsten’ — warmest — usually followed by ‘Grüße’, which is almost certainly the word that comes next. So we have “The warmest greetings” — aus Venerdig — “from Venice”. I’m done.

  2. Suzanne Couch says:

    And a photo from this year’s celebration at the Bauer Hotel with another-Wish you were here❣️

    On Fri, Jul 26, 2019 at 10:30 AM seductivevenice wrote:

    > seductivevenice posted: “One of my students, who was here for the year > from Germany, tried to help me translate and decipher this postcard, but > some of the handwriting is beyond us. This group wrote the postcard on a > Monday, that is clear, and it is signed by num” >

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