From the Founding of Venice to the Present

Happy Founders Day! Today marks the anniversary of the creation of Venice, attributed to March 24 in the year 421 at noon. This day coincides with the Feast of the Annunciation and the founding of the church of San Giacomo at Rialto.

Enjoy this short video created by Tony Green. He married his paintings to his music to honor Venice’s 16 centuries.

San Giacomo (from Wikimedia)

And as for the present day? Check out this article about a proposed “Ten Commandments” to manage overtourism in Venice and Florence. One proposal is to ban Airbnb and change the management of short and long term rentals in the cities. Venetians quoted in the article, including those who manage rentals and work in the city, point out the pros and cons of this idea. Something needs to be done–hopefully this new blueprint can offer a viable solution so this city, founded 1,600 years ago, will continue to thrive!

About seductivevenice

Teacher, writer, traveler, dancer, reader, photographer, gardener.
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4 Responses to From the Founding of Venice to the Present

  1. Karen Cogan says:

    Hi Kathleen… Check out this article on Venice is new control room!!!

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/venice-control-room-tourism/index.html

    Karen

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • I saw this! Pretty crazy. I’ve heard mixed reviews from Venetians about it. And one person pointed out that we all carry a gps around as part of our cell phones, so why should we be so concerned about being tracked like this? 😛

  2. Shawn Von Ins says:

    I know it’s a complex issue, but to me, it seems that over-tourism and Airbnbs are two related but separate problems. Airbnb rentals I can see make it more difficult for Venetians to afford housing, but if anyone should understand supply and demand, it would be Venetians.

    People who stay in Airbnbs are exactly the kind of tourist that Venice wants: people who spend money in Venice. Not just the apartment, but also for meals and everything else. People renting apartments are very likely to be staying for several days, people who love Venice.

    Also, it’s my understanding, that there are more than a few buildings in Venice that are vacant. Perhaps something could be done to make it easier for Venetians to reclaim these places? I read a couple articles about how there are quite a few Venetian squatters currently.

    Meanwhile, the cruise ships (No Grandi Navi!) seem to be a far more serious issue when it comes to over-tourism. Those visitors are only there for a day, and put relatively few dollars into the Venetian economy. Banning these ships seems like an obvious first step, but there’s money and politics involved there; I get it.

    I have no idea if simply banning cruise ships would solve the tourism problem, but it would be a good start. I like that idea more than the turnstiles that have popped up (pre-covid). A tourist tax seems silly to me, and just simply a money grab. People that have traveled across the globe to see Venice aren’t going to be deterred by having to pay a few extra Euros. Do they need to limit tour groups? Do people need to make reservations? It seems like many of the proposed ideas to fix the problem are the very thing that will turn the city into Venezialand.

    Yeah, these are complex issues. Anyway, Happy 1600th, Venice (my happy place)! Cin Cin!

    • You bring up so many good point, Shawn. Yes, it’s a very complex issue with arguments to consider from both sides. Long term rentals can be a great solution but unfortunately sometimes become part of the problem when they’re owned by outside companies and the wealth they generate all leaves Venice. When I go, I rent from local Venetians whenever possible. There are companies that highlight local ownership, like Views on Venice. Maybe that’s a great way to support the Venetians and help create more sustainable tourism. And yes, the cruise ships have got to go!

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